Competition Gallery

 

Cameron Haynes

Yellowish White, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Brownish Black from, 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Grayish Yellowish Green, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


As Yet Unknown, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Purplish White, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Just Plain Black, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Dark Red, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Dark Yellowish Pink, from 'What it Means to Be'

Course: MA Photography, London College of Communication

 

Haynes explores the interplay between identity and classification with individual and collective consciousness, and examines how these inform our understanding of visual representation in contemporary culture.

More interested in the perception of things than how they look in themselves, Haynes uses found portraits which he then manipulates. The surface of the photograph is rendered opaque, leaving small areas of original colour exposed in order to highlight the skin of the subject, thus creating absurd taxonomic schemes which highlight the inaccuracy of data collection when used to define individuals.


Selected Photographers

Search



Mind Unit - websites, content management and email marketing for the arts